April 22: CRUEL AND UNUSUAL – THE STORY OF THE ANGOLA 3 Film Screening at Reel Work Labor Film Festival – with speakers Marie Levin and Dr. Craig Haney

REEL WORK LABOR FILM FESTIVAL presents
TOGETHER TO END SOLITARY

FREE  EVENT: Film, Discussion, and Reception with Refreshments
Sunday, April 22, 2018
2:00 – 5:30 PM
UCSC Media Theater (Performing Arts M110), 453 Kerr Rd, Santa Cruz, CA 95064

CRUEL AND UNUSUAL-THE STORY OF THE ANGOLA 3

The Angola 3 are three Black men who collectively spent 114 years in solitary confinement torture in the USA.  They were framed for organizing against injustice inside Angola Prison in Louisiana. The film documents their decades-long struggle for justice and to build a national and international movement to end solitary confinement.

After the film and discussion, all are invited to a reception with the speakers, and free refreshments by Riverview Farms Catering and Marie Levin’s MOMM’s Pastries.

*Please RSVP using this link so UCSC can plan accessibility, free parking, and food.
*Free parking in Performing Arts Lot 126
*ADA accessible: Wheelchair, Restrooms, Parking
*Doors open 1:30pm
*Call 510.426.5322 if you want to rideshare from the SF Bay Area.
*Download Event Flier HERE
*Facebook event: Cruel and Unusual-the Story of the Angola 3

 
 Speakers

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/proxy/vRpwNyfAy6wJEymiU_hL39ws1ilWkIzqgL2lsQ7Z1nEKSgIRN4IrXCafzRjSxrWKIwodM-cIZIgx0VOsbOJ3cyEzAFxzvXVHeqgi4SsHgg=w5000-h5000Craig Haney, Ph.D. in Psychology, Juris Doctorate (JD), academic specialization: psychology and law. Expert witness in Angola 3’s lawsuit in Louisiana; Ashker v. Brown in California; January 17, 2018 Canadian ban on federal indefinite solitary confinement; and numerous lawsuits on behalf of incarcerated people. UCSC Distinguished Professor of Psychology; UC Presidential Chair, 2015-2018; Co-Director, UC Criminal Justice & Health Consortium.

 

Marie LevinMarie Levin, African American woman, organizer, and minister; California Families Against Solitary Confinement, Essie Justice Group, NLGSF Prisoner Advocacy Network, Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition; owner of MOMM’s Pastries, employer of formerly incarcerated people; sister of Sitawa Nantambu Jamaa, co-author of the Agreement to End Hostilities, and 1 of 4 Principle Negotiators for CA prisoners challenging conditions in California’s solitary units and general prison population.

Co-hosts: UC Santa Cruz Presidential Chair, California Families Against Solitary Confinement, End Solitary Santa Cruz County

Co-sponsors: ACLU-NC, Santa Cruz County Chapter; NAACP Santa Cruz County Branch #1071; Peace and Freedom Party Santa Cruz County; Santa Cruz Barrios Unidos; Santa Cruz County Community Coalition to Overcome Racism (SCCCCOR); Temple Beth El, Aptos; UC Santa Cruz Legal Studies Program; Veterans for Peace, Santa Cruz; Watsonville Brown Berets

Reel Work Labor Film Festival – Full schedule of events at reelwork.org

April 21, 3-5pm: ‘Solitary Man’ Benefit Show for SF Bay View Newspaper to Stay in Print!

BIG Bay View BENEFIT 4/21: ‘SOLITARY MAN’ at the Black Repertory Group Theater

3201 Adeline Street, Berkeley, CA 94703 (1 ½ blocks from Ashby BART)
Facebook event: https://www.facebook.com/events/1476593779118037/

It’s the biggest venue yet for “Solitary Man: A Visit to Pelican Bay State Prison,” and the wonderful folks at the Black Rep, led by the legendary Mona Vaughn Scott, are donating it to support the SF Bay View newspaper! Let’s not miss this opportunity to fill all 250 seats and meld ourselves into a fighting force for justice.

For only $10 admission, you’ll be enriched by an unforgettable and deeply transforming play by Charlie Hinton, who is working nonstop to make this benefit a big success; hear some sweet trumpet playing by co-star Fred Johnson; listen to and get involved in a panel discussion with decade-long solitary confinement survivor José Villarreal, “First Sister” of the Prison Movement Marie Levin, and Ashker attorney Anne Weills; and enjoy the company of 250 activists young and old, plenty of us to change the world. Family Pot Catering will have delicious food and beverages for sale. Go to Brown Paper Tickets, https://solitaryman.brownpapertickets.com/, today and buy up a row for you and all your friends!
– Mary Ratcliff, SF Bay View Editor

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CA Prisoners Win Historic Gains with Settlement Against Solitary Confinement

Agreement reached in Ashker v. Brown ends indeterminate long-term solitary confinement in CA, among other gains for prisoners

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – September 1, 2015
Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition

Oakland – Today, California prisoners locked in isolation achieved a groundbreaking legal victory in their ongoing struggle against the use of solitary confinement. A settlement was reached in the federal class action suit Ashker v. Brown, originally filed in 2012, effectively ending indefinite long-term solitary confinement, and greatly limiting the prison administration’s ability to use the practice, widely seen as a form of torture. The lawsuit was brought on behalf of prisoners held in Pelican Bay State Prison’s infamous Security Housing Units (SHU) for more than 10 years, where they spend 23 hours a day or more in their cells with little to no access to family visits, outdoor time, or any kind of programming.

“From the historic prisoner-led hunger strikes of 2011 and 2013, to the work of families, loved ones, and advocate, this settlement is a direct result of our grassroots organizing, both inside and outside prison walls,” said Dolores Canales of California Families Against Solitary Confinement (CFASC), and mother of a prisoner in Pelican Bay. “This legal victory is huge, but is not the end of our fight – it will only make the struggle against solitary and imprisonment everywhere stronger.” The 2011 and 2013 hunger strikes gained widespread international attention that for the first time in recent years put solitary confinement under mainstream scrutiny.

Currently, many prisoners are in solitary because of their “status” – having been associated with political ideologies or gang affiliation. However, this settlement does away with the status-based system, leaving solitary as an option only in cases of serious behavioral rule violations. Furthermore, the settlement limits the amount of time a prisoner may be held in solitary, and sets a two year Step-Down Program for the release of current solitary prisoners into the prison general population.

It is estimated that between 1,500 and 2,000 prisoners will be released from SHU within one year of this settlement. A higher security general population unit will be created for a small number of cases where people have been in SHU for more than 10 years and have a recent serious rule violation.

“Despite the repeated attempts by the prison regime to break the prisoners’ strength, they have remained unified in this fight,” said Marie Levin of CFASC and sister of a prisoner representative named in the lawsuit. “The Agreement to End Hostilities and the unity of the prisoners are crucial to this victory, and will continue to play a significant role in their ongoing struggle.” The Agreement to End Hostilities is an historic document put out by prisoner representatives in Pelican Bay in 2012 calling on all prisoners to build unity and cease hostilities between racial groups.

Prisoner representatives and their legal counsel will regularly meet with California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation officials as well as with Federal Magistrate Judge Nandor Vadas, who is tasked with overseeing the reforms, to insure that the settlement terms are being implemented.

“Without the hunger strikes and without the Agreement to End Hostilities to bring California’s prisoners together and commit to risking their lives— by being willing to die for their cause by starving for 60 days, we would not have this settlement today,” said Anne Weills of Siegel and Yee, co-counsel in the case. “It will improve the living conditions for thousands of men and women and no longer have them languishing for decades in the hole at Pelican Bay.”

“This victory was achieved by the efforts of people in prison, their families and loved ones, lawyers, and outside supporters,” said the prisoners represented in the settlement in a joint statement. “We celebrate this victory while at the same time, we recognize that achieving our goal of fundamentally transforming the criminal justice system and stopping the practice of warehousing people in prison will be a protracted struggle.”

Legal co-counsel in the case includes California Prison Focus, Siegel & Yee, Legal Services for Prisoners with Children, Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP, Chistensen O’Connor Johnson Kindness PLLC, and the Law Offices of Charles Carbone. The lead counsel is the Center for Constitutional Rights. The judge in the case is Judge Claudia Wilken in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California.

A rally and press conference are set for 12pm in front of the Elihu M Harris State Building in Oakland, which will be livestreamed at http://livestre.am/5bsWO.

The settlement can be read on CCR’s website, along with a summary. CCR has also put up downloadable clips of the plaintiffs’ depositions here.  Read statement from plaintiffs.

Report and Photos from 1st Monthly Statewide Coordinated Actions to End Solitary Confinement, March 23

March 23, 2015[This article was first published March 28, 2015 in the San Francisco Bay View ]

Statewide Coordinated Actions to End Solitary Confinement (SCATESC) began March 23, 2015. Actions were held in California from San Diego to Arcata (Arcata-Eureka, Los Angeles, Oakland, San Diego, San Jose, Santa Cruz) and Philadelphia, Penn. Activists in more locations will be joining in on April 23 and the 23rd of each month. Below is a report from just one locality, Santa Cruz, which took a creative approach.

by Willow Katz

About 45 people attended the first day of Statewide Coordinated Actions to End Solitary Confinement (SCATESC), on March 23, 2015, at the Lighthouse on West Cliff Drive in Santa Cruz. We went there to see the ocean for so many SHU and solitary prisoners who talk about their dream to see the ocean again, including Luis Esquivel.

Oakland’s action was in Oscar Grant Plaza, 14th and Broadway, the scene of many, many struggles for justice in recent years. Readers are urged to come out in droves on April 23 and the 23rd of every month. We may not be able to rid the world of all evils, but we CAN end solitary confinement!

The actions are being held in response to a call by California prisoners. Proposals for action from Pelican Bay State Prison hunger strikers in November 2013 included “designating a certain date each month as Prisoner Rights Day. … Our supporters would gather in locations throughout California to expose [California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation] CDCR’s actions and rally support efforts to secure our rights. We can see this action growing from month to month as more people inside and out become aware of it and join our struggle.”

Actions were held March 23 in California – at Arcata, Los Angeles, Oakland, San Diego, San Jose and Santa Cruz– and Philadelphia. Monterey is planning future actions, and we expect more actions statewide, nationally and internationally.

Activists Annie Kane and Jerry Elster check out the window slits atop Oakland City Hall. A city worker told them that behind the slits are SHU-like cells that are no longer used. – Photo: Kim Rohrbach

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URGENT: Stop strip, scanner, and dog searches

PHSS header

The CA Dept of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) just proposed regulations mandating use of dogs, scanners, and traumatizing strip searches for people coming into a prison for a contact visit with a loved one. 

“They want to be free to pursue the maintenance of the SHU torture units and the expansion of the prison industrial complex (and the ever-growing portion of the public’s tax dollars) without the prospect of legitimate criticism and the voice of opposition.” -Prisoner in Corcoran State Prison SHU

We need your help to stop this human rights violation before 5pm today!

They have given the outrageous period of only five days for public comment on this deeply unjust policy.

Several months ago, due to your your principled action in writing to the Dept of Corrections regarding the proposed censorship regulations, they shelved those regulations!

I’m writing to ask you to do it again! 

As a family member, it is a serious violation of my human rights to be forced to be humiliated in order to see my brother and give him family support.

There’s been more family involvement in the prison system over the last three years than ever before, and we’re challenging what they’re doing. People are watching and they don’t like that – it’s not as easy to get away with abuses of power.

Please weigh in and speak out about these regulations TODAY, Sept. 23rd.
The comment period closes at 5pm tonight.

It is absolutely crucial to act immediately, and show them we can mobilize some serious opposition.

Share this with everyone you know who might also want to send a letter.

Thank you for everything you do. Marie Levin

Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition
A member of Californians United for a Responsible Budget

Excellent Article: CDCr’s Attempt to Silence Prisoners, Ban Critical “Oppositional” Publications

Censored and ‘Obscene’ in Solitary

by Sarah Shourd
http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/06/21/censored-and-obscene-in-solitary.html

After a huge hunger strike to protest the state prison system’s inhuman conditions, California is threatening to ban any written material deemed “oppositional to authority and society.”

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Solitary Confinement Bill Passes Public Safety Committee, Could Mark End of Torturous Practice

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE    April 9, 2014

Press Contact:     Isaac Ontiveros—510.517.6612
Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition

Oakland—A bill designed to bring about reforms to the California’s internationally condemned use of indefinite solitary confinement, passed its first hurdle yesterday by a 4 to 2 vote (with one abstention) in the State Assembly’s Public Safety Committee. Assembly Member Tom Ammiano authored AB 1652 in response to the historic hunger strike last summer that included the participation of 30,000 prisoners in the majority of the California’s sprawling prison system.   Some of the strikers refused food for 60 days. The prisoners agreed to suspend their hunger strike on September 5, 2013, with the promise of legislative hearings on the use and conditions of solitary confinement in California’s prisons.

The bill could bring very significant changes to California’s use of solitary confinement.  AB1652 would prohibit the use of solitary except for 14 very serious offenses, and would set a cap on the solitary term to 5 years.   AB 1652 would effectively end the bitterly contested practice of “gang validation” that has led to thousands of prisoners serving indefinite sentences in solitary based merely on association with other prisoners.

According to the bill’s author, “The United States is an outlier in the world on the use of incarceration and solitary confinement, and California is an outlier in the United States and is the only state to use solitary confinement for indefinite terms where SHU [Security Housing Unit] terms are assigned for administrative reasons such as being in possession of artwork or books…

California’s SHUs do not meet international human rights standards regarding the treatment of incarcerated people. The conditions amounted to torture, and groups are challenging the constitutionality of the SHU. This bill is intended to limit the use of solitary confinement to people who have committed serious rule violations, and restore time credits for inmates currently serving time in the SHU on a non-rule violation assignment.”

“This bill responds to some of the core demands of the hunger strikers, namely that indefinite SHU status should be abolished,” said Donna Willmott, who worked on behalf of the Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition’s legislative working group to help California decision-makers take action on  solitary confinement.  “It is really important to recognize that the human rights struggle being waged by prisoners and their supporters are having an impact.  Given the horrendous violence of solitary confinement, we are eager to work with decision-makers to use this bill to get as many people out of solitary as we can, including making good-time credits retroactive for those who have suffered solitary based solely on accusation of gang membership and association.”

“Some of our loved ones have suffered in these inhumane conditions for 20 or 30 years or more,”  said Marie Levin, an activists with the Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition whose brother Sitawa Jamaa was one of the lead representatives of the prisoner hunger strikers. “We will continue our fight to make sure AB 1652 can provide some relief to our families, and we will continue to fight until the torture of solitary confinement is a thing of the past.”
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