Feb 24 California Prison Focus event: STEEL BARS AND REAL SCARS – Watani Stiner

Feb 24 CPF event _Watani and children

SPOKEN WORD & PERFORMANCE
Sunday, February 24, 2019

2 – 4 pm
Sherith Israel – 2266 California St. San Francisco, CA 94115

 

California Prison Focus presents Watani Stiner and Children of the Revolutionary: Larry Stiner Jr., Latanya Stiner, and Lige Stiner.

Witness the devastating impact of imprisonment on families as seen through the eyes of a formerly incarcerated father who successfully escaped from San Quentin before he voluntarily returned, and the son and daughter left to grow up without him.

Join us to hear the poignant reflections and stories of this family trio as they recount their journey through those long years of separation. Through spoken word and performance, they will share their stories of childhood, imprisonment, escape, exile, and political activism while offering their perspectives on how incarceration and family separation affected each one of them personally.

Support an end to mass incarceration.

Free event hosted by California Prison Focus
For questions: contact@prisons.org
http://www.prisons.org


California Prison Focus (CPF) is a non-profit human rights organization dedicated to exposing the abuse, violation, and neglect of basic human rights concerning our community members behind bars. CPF publishes a quarterly newsletter, providing a platform for otherwise silenced voices of those on the inside and continues to fight for ending solitary confinement torture. Founded in 1991, the all-volunteer group operates entirely on individual donations and small grants.

CPF is a founding member of the Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition.

Build Unity: Don’t let CDC undermine the Agreement to End Hostilities

by Jalil Muntaqim   Sept. 18, 2015

The hunger strike victory – settlement of the class action suit against solitary confinement – is fantastic, but now, more hard work confronts them all. They will continue to be in a relentless fight to prevent COs (correctional officers) from destroying the unity and continued political determination of the vision for prison reform in California.

'Free Jalil Muntaqim' graphicObviously, there will come a time in which the prisoners will need to essentially rebrand, identify and complete what they started – the five demands – and to ensure the sustainability of organizing as well as build capacity to grow the work into a substantial statewide political campaign for prison reform. I sincerely hope they will consider this victory as a tactical victory, not a strategic one – especially when parole decisions continue to be constricted and there is an ongoing need for more programs that serve to support prisoners for their return to the community.

In fact, I hope they will begin the process of floating a proposal to broaden the overall campaign for prison and parole reform and ultimately end mass incarceration – demand abolition. If they can successfully make this transition, they will certainly create the paradigm for the country to replicate.

One of the first things that must be done as part of the transition and to move the prison-cultural-psychological determinant forward would be to educate the prison and public about how the state will seek to undermine their success. For example, publications should have issues solely devoted to incidents in which state officials (COs) attempt to undermine the Agreement to End Hostilities.

I hope they will begin the process of floating a proposal to broaden the overall campaign for prison and parole reform and ultimately end mass incarceration – demand abolition. If they can successfully make this transition, they will certainly create the paradigm for the country to replicate.

It is these testimonies and examples of fight-back that can serve to strengthen the capacity to build unity and uniformity in the fight. Secondly, this would broaden the future vision of the campaign from the inside out and then the outside in. I imagine family members and loved ones will want to concentrate on parole issues and prison medical and health concerns as the next major issues to be tackled.

Jalil Muntaqim

Jalil has been imprisoned since 1971 when, at the age of 19, he was active in the Black Panther Party and the Black Liberation Army. He spent from 1975-77 in San Quentin before being sent to New York state prisons. Send our brother some love and light: Anthony Bottom, 77A4283, Attica Correctional Facility, P.O. Box 149, Attica, NY 14011-0149.

This was published in the SF Bay View:
http://sfbayview.com/2015/09/build-unity-dont-let-cdc-undermine-the-agreement-to-end-hostilities/

Thurs, April 16th Lecture Event: “Human Rights, Racism, and the Police State”

Spring2015_SJSU_HRLectureSeriesEvent_Poster

 

 *Free* and open to the public.
Bay Area students and community groups welcome!

 

The 2015 Human Rights Lecture Event features a full day of panels, workshops, and activities with organizers from Chicago, Ferguson, and the Greater Bay Area. Dr. Angela Davis will deliver a Keynote Speech on “Inequality and the Role of Resistance.”  (Link to RSVP for free tickets).

 

The day’s events begin at noon, where students and community members can learn from and engage with activists at the forefront of contemporary movements challenging police violence, mass incarceration, and social inequality.  Activities include:

 

SOLITARY CELL ART INSTALLATIONS (12:00pm-5:00pm STUDENT UNION RAISED PATIO) from the Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition 

 

LUNCH PANEL (12:00pm-1:00pm, MLK 225) with community organizers from Ferguson, Chicago, #BlackLivesMatter, and the greater Bay Area

 

 • WORKSHOP (12:30-2:30, STUDENT UNION RAISED PATIO) by the HipHop Chess Federation

 

 • KNOW YOUR RIGHTS PRESENTATION (1:30pm-2:30pm, MLK 225) by WeCopWatch

 

 • TALKING CIRCLE (3:30pm-5:00pm, MLK 225) where students can engage with local and national organizers to build on current movements to end mass incarceration and police violence.

 

 • KEYNOTE SPEECH: DR. ANGELA DAVIS, “Inequality and the Role of Resistance,” 7:00 pm, Morris Dailey Auditorium (doors open at 6:30, pre-program African cultural performance by Jaliya at 6:45).

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